Code Talker Alfred Peaches passes

Navajo Times | Ravonelle Yazzie Navajo Code Talker Alfred Peaches listens to a speaker talk during Navajo Code Talkers Day on Aug. 14, 2015 at the Veterans Memorial Park in Window Rock. According to a press release from the Navajo Nation President’s Office, Peaches passed away on Jan. 16 at the Flagstaff Medical Center in Flagstaff. A memorial service will be held on Jan. 23 at the Leupp First Presbyterian Church at 11 a.m. in Leupp, Ariz.

Navajo Times | Ravonelle Yazzie
Navajo Code Talker Alfred Peaches listens to a speaker talk during Navajo Code Talkers Day on Aug. 14, 2015 at the Veterans Memorial Park in Window Rock. According to a press release from the Navajo Nation President’s Office, Peaches passed away on Jan. 16 at the Flagstaff Medical Center in Flagstaff. A memorial service will be held on Jan. 23 at the Leupp First Presbyterian Church at 11 a.m. in Leupp, Ariz.

DURANGO, Colo.

Code Talker Alfred James Peaches passed away on Jan. 16 at the Flagstaff Medical Center, according to a press release from the Navajo Nation President and Vice President’s Office.

He was 90.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Jan. 23 at Leupp First Presbyterian Church, with the Ira H. Hayes American Legion Post 84 providing color guard and the Navajo Hopi Honor Riders escorting.

Peaches was born on April 28, 1925 in Shonto, Ariz. to the late Adelaide Donald and Henry Peaches, the release states.

He was Bitter Water Clan born for White Corn Clan. His maternal grandfather was Water’s Edge and his paternal grandfather was Zuni.

Peaches served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1943 to 1946, attaining the rank of corporal, according to the release. He served again in the Korean War.

He is survived by his wife, Jeanette Hillis Peaches, daughters Doris Ross and Terri Peaches, and sons Glenn and Nathaniel Peaches, as well as five grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Two sons, Vernon and Albert, preceded him in death.

President Russell Begaye has ordered flags on the Navajo Nation to be flown at half-staff on Jan. 23.

“The Navajo people have lost another warrior that defended freedom and the American way of life during World War II,” Begaye stated in the release.

Vice President Jonathan Nez, who hails from Peaches’ home chapter of Shonto, said the legacy of Peaches and the other Code Talkers can be carried on by preserving the Navajo language.

Peaches’ daughters issued a statement thanking the “excellent” nurses and staff at the Flagstaff Medical Center for their care of their father while he was there.

 

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About Author

Cindy Yurth

Cindy Yurth is the Tséyi' Bureau reporter, covering the Central Agency of the Navajo Nation. Her other beats include agriculture and Arizona state politics. She holds a bachelor’s degree in technical journalism from Colorado State University with a cognate in geology. She has been in the news business since 1980 and with the Navajo Times since 2005, and is the author of “Exploring the Navajo Nation Chapter by Chapter.” She can be reached at cyurth@navajotimes.com.